Articles Tagged with Up Periscope

Adding to this years catalog of Navy CO’s fired the Navy Times reports.

The Navy has fired the commanding officer of the attack submarine Memphis as 10 members of his crew are under investigation in an alleged cheating ring involving shipboard training exams, according to a Navy release.

See prior post here about Relief for Cause of Navy commanding officers.

Navy Times reports:

A former astronaut who gained notoriety for stalking a romantic rival after driving 900 miles straight from Houston is expected to be discharged from the Navy.

A board of inquiry made up of three Navy admirals voted 3-0 Thursday give Navy Capt. Lisa Nowak an “other than honorable” discharge and downgrade her rank from captain to commander, which affects her paygrade and pensionimage thumb16 Meteor burns out.

Declaration When enlisting or at certain other times:"
I, _____, do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will support and defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic; that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same; and that I will obey the orders of the President of the United States and the orders of the officers appointed over me, according to regulations and the Uniform Code of Military Justice. So help me God." (Title 10, US Code; Act of 5 May 1960 replacing the wording first adopted in 1789, with amendment effective 5 October 1962).

When commissioning and at certain other times:
"I, _____ (SSAN), having been appointed an officer in the ____ of the United States, as indicated above in the grade of _____ do solemnly swear (or affirm) that I will support and defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign or domestic, that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the same; that I take this obligation freely, without any mental reservations or purpose of evasion; and that I will well and faithfully discharge the duties of the office upon which I am about to enter; So help me God."

During the Revolutionary War, the Continental Congress established different oaths for the enlisted men and officers of the Continental Army:

Enlisted: The first oath, voted on 14 June 1775 as part of the act creating the Continental Army, read: "I _____ have, this day, voluntarily enlisted myself, as a soldier, in the American continental army, for one year, unless sooner discharged: And I do bind myself to conform, in all instances, to such rules and regulations, as are, or shall be, established for the government of the said Army." The original wording was effectively replaced by Section 3, Article 1, of the Articles of War approved by Congress on 20 September 1776, which specified that the oath of enlistment read: "I _____ swear (or affirm as the case may be) to be trued to the United States of America, and to serve them honestly and faithfully against all their enemies opposers whatsoever; and to observe and obey the orders of the Continental Congress, and the orders of the Generals and officers set over me by them."

Officers: Continental Congress passed two versions of this oath of office, applied to military and civilian national officers. The first, on 21 October 1776, read: "I _____, do acknowledge the Thirteen United States of America, namely, New Hampshire, Massachusetts Bay, Rhode Island, Connecticut, New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Delaware, Maryland, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, and Georgia, to be free, independent, and sovereign states, and declare, that the people thereof owe no allegiance or obedience to George the third, king of Great Britain; and I renounce, refuse and abjure any allegiance or obedience to him; and I do swear that I will, to the utmost of my power, support, maintain, and defend the said United States against the said king, George the third, and his heirs and successors, and his and their abettors, assistants and adherents; and will serve the said United States in the office of _____, which I now hold, and in any other office which I may hereafter hold by their appointment, or under their authority, with fidelity and honour, and according to the best of my skill and understanding. So help me God." The revised version, voted 3 February 1778, read "I, _____ do acknowledge the United States of America to be free, independent and sovereign states, and declare that the people thereof owe no allegiance or obedience, to George the third, king of Great Britain; and I renounce, refuse and abjure any allegiance or obedience to him: and I do swear (or affirm) that I will, to the utmost of my power, support, maintain and defend the said United States, against the said king George the third and his heirs and successors, and his and their abettors, assistants and adherents, and will serve the said United States in the office of _____ which I now hold, with fidelity, according to the best of my skill and understanding. So help me God."

You can see more of the history of U.S. military oaths at the U.S. Army Center of Military History.

Navy Times reports that:

An active-duty Seabee is wanted for questioning in the slaying of his pregnant wife, authorities said.

Steelworker First Class (SCW) Eric Gilford, 31, disappeared after his wife, Kristine, was found stabbed to death May 26 in a residence in the Chicago suburb of Villa Park, Illinois authorities said.

Army Times reports that:

Experts say Fort Bragg likely violated the First Amendment when it sought to prohibit reporters from identifying accusers at a soldier’s arraignment.

The Observer doesn’t publish names of victims of sexual crimes. But Pernell faces charges other than sex crimes.

Pilot Online reports that:

For years, the top officer in the Virginia National Guard has had a paid position with a business run by one of his subordinate officers.

Newman promoted Bonanni to the assistant adjutant general’s post in 2008 while collecting a paycheck from his company.

FayObserver reports that:

An Army major who allegedly told another soldier that his fellow jury members in an October court-martial acted improperly and with an agenda testified Thursday that he never made such an allegation.

Pvt. Justin A. Boyle – a sergeant before having his rank stripped – was convicted in October of involuntary manslaughter and conspiracy for his role in the death of Pfc. Luke Brown.

You may remember the serious of stories about lawyer Orly Taitz, and you may remember that she was sanctioned for her actions in the case of an Army captain seeking to stop her deployment.  Well . . .

The Orange County Register reports that: 

Orly Taitz has been dealt another legal loss in her battle to prove President Barack Obama is not qualified to be president, as a federal appeals court in Atlanta has upheld a judge’s $20,000 sanction of Taitz.

  • Stars & Stripes reports.

The Army recently asked 45 of its soldiers in the highest enlisted rank to retire for substandard performance, past criminal convictions, problems with alcohol, fraternization or sexual harassment in their recent pasts.

Of the 45 sergeants major whose records were flagged under the newly reinstituted Qualitative Management Program, 28 complied, putting in their retirement paperwork and quietly fading away.

But 15 fought it, arguing that they were valuable Army assets despite any previous incidents. A panel of their peers usually agreed: 12 of the 15 were allowed to remain on active duty. The remaining three were forced to retire, however.