Military death penalty

Stars & Stripes reports on United States v. Gray and other death penalty cases.

In December 2008, former Army Pvt. Ronald Gray was on the brink of becoming the first military execution in almost 50 years.  .  .  .  But the week before Gray was to receive a lethal injection, a federal judge halted the execution because of a new appeal. . . .

[F]ederal defenders who took over his case say they’ve found new evidence that his original military lawyers should have discovered.

The piece also talks about United States v. Parker.

In the case of former Marine Corps Lance Cpl. Kenneth Parker, who was convicted of killing two fellow Marines, he has had at least seven lawyers. They’ve written so many different briefs that the courts recently ordered his new lawyer to start from scratch and file one appeals brief, as is customary in a capital case.  (Note:  NMCCA recently held oral argument on how much time the counsel might get to file.) . . .

In the case of former Marine Corps Lance Cpl. Kenneth Parker, who was convicted of killing two fellow Marines, he has had at least seven lawyers. They’ve written so many different briefs that the courts recently ordered his new lawyer to start from scratch and file one appeals brief, as is customary in a capital case.

Here is a piece from the Bellingham Herald leading off with United States v. Curtis.

And here is a link to DMLHS on CAAFLog with links to several other articles.

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