Wikipedia as a reliable source

Well, I use Wikipedia for research.  But, I use it “in some limited situations . . . for getting a sense of a term’s common usage."  Fire Insurance Exchange v. Oltman & Blackner, Case No. 201004262-CA, 2012 UT App 230 (Utah App. 2012)(discussing the uses and reliability of Wikipedia as a source of information).

See e.g., United States v. Jones, ARMY 20090401 (A. Ct. Crim. App. December 14, 2011),   Appellant was accused of effectively “Equating MOS trainees to permanent party – grandmothers to toads”  The court cites to Wikipedia for the proposition that the expression “WIKIPEDIA, (a Serbian expression akin to the familiar "apples to oranges" idiom in English) (last visited Dec. 1, 2011); in United States v. Magalhaes, NMCCA 200602480 (N-M Ct. Crim. App. February 21, 2008), the court cites to Wikipedia for the definition of the Pythagorean Theorem; in United States v. Ober, ACCA again resorts to Wikipedia for discussion of Kazza one of the early “programs” used to exchange many things over the internet, but for our purposes CP (which was also done in State v. Ballard, 2012-NMCA-043, ¶ 19 n.1, 276 P.3d 976 (N.M. Ct. App. 2012)(citing Wikipedia to define "peer-to-peer file sharing").). 

But the Fire Insurance Exchange court cites to these several cases and there is an interesting discussion of Wikipedia.

Citing Wikipedia is as controversial as it is common.2 Some courts approve it, others condemn it. Compare United States v. Lawson, 677 F.3d 629, 650 (4th Cir. 2012) (stating that the court is "troubled by Wikipedia’s lack of reliability"), Bing Shun Li v. Holder, 400 Fed. App’x 854, 857-58 (5th Cir. 2010) (expressing "disapproval of the [immigration judge]’s reliance on Wikipedia and [warning] against any improper reliance on it or similarly unreliable internet sources in the future"), Badasa v. Mukasey, 540 F.3d 909, 910-11 (8th Cir. 2008) (noting Wikipedia’s acknowledgment that, "at any given moment," an entry "could be in the middle of a large edit or it could have been recently vandalized" (citation and internal quotation marks omitted)), and In re Marriage of Lamoure, 132 Cal. Rptr. 3d 1, 15 (Cal. Ct. App. 2011) ("We do not consider Wikipedia a sufficiently reliable source" for defining the term "noncustodial."), with Prude v. Clarke, 675 F.3d 732, 734 (7th Cir. 2012) (citing Wikipedia entry, in the context of an Eighth Amendment challenge, for the proposition that an anal fissure "is no fun at all"), United States v. Brown, 669 F.3d 10, 18 & n.12 (1st Cir. 2012) (citing Wikipedia for its definition of "sovereign citizen movement," one of a criminal defendant’s "atypical legal beliefs"), Murdock v. Astrue, 458 Fed. App’x 702, 705 n.3 (10th Cir. 2012) (citing Wikipedia for "some examples of block lengths from cities in this country"), and State v. Ballard, 2012-NMCA-043, ¶ 19 n.1, 276 P.3d 976 (N.M. Ct. App. 2012)(citing Wikipedia to define "peer-to-peer file sharing").